Have you had your skin check this summer?

Melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in Australia. One person for every 120 will risk death from melanoma skin cancer by their 85th birthday, and 1 in every 18 being diagnosed with melanoma at some stage before the age of 85.

The good news is that if melanoma is identified at an early stage, simple treatment can bring good results. Whilst there have been significant improvements in treatment options for advanced melanoma over the last few years, prevention measures and early detection of new melanomas remain our best chance to reduce mortality.

National Skin Cancer Action Week

Research released this week shows that only 44% of Australian adults are wearing hats when exposed to UV rays, and we’re not seeking the shade during peak UV times. On a positive note we are more likely to use sunscreen.

 

In light of the findings the Cancer Council and the Australasian College of Dermatologists are reminding Australians to Slip Slop Slap Seek and Slide.

Only 1 in 5 Adults are using three or more sun protective measures. There is a tendency towards applying sunscreen in the morning and thinking you are protected all day, but sunscreen should be the last line of defence.

The most common places that get burnt are the face, head, nose and ears, along with hands and arms. By neglecting to wear a broadbrim hat Aussies are putting themselves at risk.

Dermatologists are regularly treating skin cancers that could have been prevented by using sun protective measures:

favicon  Wear a broadbrim hat

favicon  Choose clothing that covers your arms and shoulders

favicon  Use sunscreen with an SPF 30 or above

favicon  Slip on some sunglasses

favicon  Stay in the shade

Unfortunately living in this lovely country means that two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the age of 70, and we spend more than $1 billion per year treating skin cancer.

Early detection is important, skin cancers can often be treated successfully if spotted early enough. Get to know your skin, what is normal for you and keep an eye out for changes. If you get a new spot or something changes in size, shape or colour get it checked out by your General Practitioner or Dermatologist.

Kleresca

Kleresca®, a new treatment for acne vulgaris has been launched in Australia. It is only offered in Dermatology practices and Central Sydney Dermatology are one of the few privileged to offer it for their patients.

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For more about Kleresca®